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Intervention

November 17th, 2010

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'Barbara Covington has one more chance to save her daughter from a devastating addiction: staging an intervention. But when eighteen-year-old Emily disappears on the way to drug treatment---and her interventionist is found dead at the airport---Barbara enters her darkest nightmare of all.Barbara and her son set out to find Emily before Detective Kent Harlan arrests her for a crime he is sure she committed. Fearing for Emily's life, Barbara maintains her daughter's innocence, but does she really know her anymore? Meanwhile, Kent has questions of his own. His gut tells him that this is a case of an addict killing for drugs. But as he gets to know Barbara, he begins to hope he's wrong about Emily.Fear rises as the mysteries intensify: Did Emily's obsession with drugs lead her to commit murder---or is she another victim of a cold-blooded killer?In this gripping stand-alone novel of intrigue and suspense, bestselling fiction author Terri Blackstock delivers the up-all-night drama that readers around the world have come to expect from her.'


Book Review

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Fiction Books 'Barbara Covington has one more chance to save her daughter from a devastating addiction: staging an intervention. But when eighteen-year-old Emily disappears on the way to drug treatment---and her interventionist is found dead at the airport---Barbara enters her darkest nightmare of all.Barbara and her son set out to find Emily before Detective Kent Harlan arrests her for a crime he is sure she committed. Fearing for Emily's life, Barbara maintains her daughter's innocence, but does she really know her anymore? Meanwhile, Kent has questions of his own. His gut tells him that this is a case of an addict killing for drugs. But as he gets to know Barbara, he begins to hope he's wrong about Emily.Fear rises as the mysteries intensify: Did Emily's obsession with drugs lead her to commit murder---or is she another victim of a cold-blooded killer?In this gripping stand-alone novel of intrigue and suspense, bestselling fiction author Terri Blackstock delivers the up-all-night drama that readers around the world have come to expect from her.'
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  1. Jennifer Medlock
    November 17th, 2010 at 07:27 | #1

    Rating

    Barbara Covington is a woman at her wit’s end! Her 18 year old daughter Emily has fallen into a world of drugs and alcohol. Emily has been depressed since her dad died of cancer and there is nothing that her mom or her little brother Lance can do to get through to her.

    Barbara really plans on trying tough love with Emily. They hold an intervention between Barbara, Lance, Emily, and her therapist where Emily is told she must go to rehab in another state that she doesn’t have any options left. Emily goes, but not happily. Barbara is relieved that Emily is going and then the unimaginable happens…Emily is kidnapped and her therapist is murdered. The cops think that Emily might be a murderer on the run, but her mom and brother know better and they join the hunt to find Emily…but they are trying to find her because they know she is in trouble.

    I have to admit that one of my favorite characters in the book was Lance. They young kid is smart and witty and was still grounded in his faith. Out of every character struggling with God and soing the right thing I believe this little kid was the more stable one of the lot. I really hope that we get to read more about Lance in another book.

    Not any real romance in the book to speak of. It would have been nice to have Barbara finding herself a bit closer to the detective, but in the end the book was about finding Emily and for the characters to find their faith again.

    Good book. I did find the storyline a bit slower than her previous books and a bit harder to stick with, but all in all I am glad that I did.

  2. T.E. George
    November 17th, 2010 at 20:13 | #2

    Rating

    Terri Blackstock has delivered a number of best selling series including Restoration, Cape Refuge, Northpoint 911, and Suncoast Chronicles. Over the past few months she has stepped away from that formula to offer two excellent stand-alone novels in a row. First, in Double Minds, Blackstock carried us into the world of the Christian recording industry. Now, Intervention opens up a world every parent fears and too many have experienced.

    Barbara Covington is a widow doing her best to raise two teenage children without their father. After years of fighting to save her daughter from her own destructive drug habit, Barbara calls in an interventionist from a high priced drug rehab center in Atlanta. What begins as a mother’s fears and prayers for her daughter’s rehabilitation in a distant city transforms into an unbelievable nightmare when the interventionist is found murdered and Emily, her daughter, missing.

    This is the story of one woman’s determination to find her daughter and prove her innocence. Whatever the cost. At every step I asked myself, what would I do as a parent to save my child in a similar situation? Be careful before you answer. What we learn from Barbara and Emily is that no family crisis occurs at some convenient time in some easily solved manner. Well meaning people sometimes offer the tritest words of, what they mistakenly think is encouragement. Sometimes it feels as though no one understands and that the heavens have grown silent – for both parent and child.

    The characters are people struggling with their faith in the crucible of extraordinary circumstances. Knowing that the author has personally worked in ministries to women just like Emily only makes the story more compelling. Intervention is an intensely personal and spiritual novel; one that quite possibly will garner the label of “preachy” by some. As far as this reviewer is concerned it is a message that needs to be heard by all parents and their children. We are all works in progress in need of the ultimate Interventionist. Thank you, Terri, for reminding us of that truth.

  3. T. C Gerlach
    November 18th, 2010 at 06:52 | #3

    Rating

    I was taken with this book from the beginning. Barbara Covington is trying to figure out how to help Emily, her daughter, with her substance abuse problem while also trying to figure out what she did wrong to make her daughter turn to drugs. Her son Lance is the straight laced one she can depend on, but how much should she? The plot has twists and turns after the woman hired to take Emily to a rehab center is killed in the parking lot of the airport. The characters were believable and well written. Instead of the christian part of the book being overwhelming it was more how each of the characters struggled with their faith in the midst of what was going on. A quick read, that had substance to it and even made me think how my beliefs would stand up in the same type of situation.

  4. Laura
    November 18th, 2010 at 18:05 | #4

    Rating

    The idea for the book is a good one but it wasn’t carried out very well. The first part of the book is interesting and quick paced. Towards the end though, it was way too preachy. I felt like I was just reading an anti drug book and one that was constantly quoting the Bible to me. There were way too many unbelievable things happening and then the ending wrapped everything up nicely. Life isn’t like that and the way this book is written was so unrealistic. Plus, it seemed the author tried to put too much in. It wasn’t enough that the mom was smarter than the police in finding out what happened to her daughter, but she was able to talk the detective into sharing information with her and carting her son around. I can’t see this ever happening. Plus, she tried to throw some love in there between the detective and the mom. If the book had finished as strongly as it began (with the exception of the mom just picking a rehab center by googling Christian Rehab and choosing the first one on the list without checking it out), I would recommend it, but I can’t recommend it the way it is.

  5. Maxine S. Gauthier
    November 20th, 2010 at 04:06 | #5

    Rating

    This is the first book I have written by this author. The story got me hooked at the very beginning and I found the rest to be very engaging and fast paced – I especially liked how the author took the very real subject of tragic teen drug addiction and wove a suspenseful story around this subject. I felt she very accurately described the despair of the mother & her urgent quest to hang up to the hope that her daughter could face her drug addiction while also accurately portraying the father who had to place blame on those he felt were responsible for his daughter’s tragic ending.

  6. Gramma Sally
    November 20th, 2010 at 08:15 | #6

    Rating

    I won’t summarize the plot because that has been done by earlier reviewers. This is my first book by this author and the description should have contained the tag Christian Fiction. It seemed almost as if the main purpose of the book was to preach. “He used to be a good man, but he needs Christ. He needs to get that bitterness out of his heart.”

    That was not my only difficulty with the book but first I must say that I found the story line engaging and that’s what kept me reading. That being said, I found myself saying, “Oh, please!” on almost every other page. So many things occurred to make the story work that never would have happened in real life. The brilliant captor conveniently left a mirror hanging on the wall of the cell. A police detective continued giving the crazed mother information even though she had taken matters into her own hands and interfered with the investigation several times.

    And then there’s the simplistic, sometimes corny, writing. This is not a book to read for the beauty of the prose and the writing gets in the way of the story by drawing attention to itself. Sometimes it doesn’t even make sense. “Irony razored through Barbara like asbestos, cutting her from the inside.” There are so many suspense writers who can also turn a phrase that I would advise you not to waste your time and money on “Intervention.”

  7. K. Nettles
    November 20th, 2010 at 10:26 | #7

    Rating

    I first discovered Terri Blackstock through her Newporte 911 series. Although I am usually disappointed in so-called Christian fiction, Blackstock’s book have always been a satisfying, even thought-provoking read. Her characters are very human — each with their own flaws, disappointments, fears, and desires — and the storylines are engaging. Her books are about faith, but are rarely preachy. Intervention comes right out of this mold.

    Intervention is told mostly from the point of view of the mother, Barbara, during a desparate search for her missing daughter. As her son, Lance, guides her through the open journals on Myspace and Facebook, she learns how her daughter felt in the months leading up to the crisis and must face up to how her own actions contributed to what happened. Her reaction to each discovery was compelling to me as a mother — I could relate to the emotions, the rationalizing, and the absolute disregard for personal consequences to do whatever it took to find my child. The ending contains a bit of a surprise twist and underscores the fact that Christians are often victimized by others who claim to be Christian as well.

  8. Michael Hickerson
    November 22nd, 2010 at 06:46 | #8

    Rating

    One of my biggest criticisms of contemporary Christian fiction is that while the stories and situations may be compelling and interesting, the characters and their reactions to the situations or chain of events often are not. Too often, you can predict the story arc for each character based on his or her introduction in the novel. You can guess who will be “saved” and who won’t be early in the story, thus ruining some of the enjoyment of the story and diminishing the authenticity of the novel. (I’m looking at you “Left Behind.”)

    So, when a book comes along from the contemporary Christian genre that has not only well drawn, realistic characters but also ones who react in authentic manners, it always draws my attention a bit. That’s the case with Terri Blackstock’s “Intervention”

    “Invention” is the story of widowed mother Barbara and her two children. Her oldest, daughter Emily has embraced the world of drugs and addiction in the wake of her father’s death while her younger son, Logan has his own struggles but hasn’t quite gone down the same path. In desperation to save her daughter, Barbara enrolls her in a rehab program, complete with an intervention agent who will come and take Emily to the facility so Emily can’t talk her mother out of this course of action. The two set off for Georgia but the interventionist is murdered in the parking garage of the Atlanta airport and Emily becomes the prime suspect. Barbara races to Atlanta with her son in tow to try and find Emily, convinced beyond a shadow of a doubt of her daughter’s innocence.

    Blackstock does a nice job of making Barbara feel like a real character over the course of the story. Her faith and prayers are authentic as as her doubts as the evidence begins to pile up. Barbara is not a perfect person or mother and Blackstock allows her to be portrayed as such at several points in the early stages of the novel.

    However, once the novel hits a certain point and some aspects of what is really going on are revealed that things being to slowly unravel. The last third of the novel depends a lot on Barbara becoming McGyver-like in her ability to get information and do certain things to help track down Emily. Yes, Google is a powerful tool but it certainly shouldn’t allow Barbara to get one step ahead of the police in her investigation as is portrayed here. And the revelation of what exactly is going here and why is a bit of a disappointment.

    It’s a shame really because for the first 200 pages, “Intervention” is a well crafted, suspense thriller with realistic characters and a horrifying situation.

  9. Harriet Klausner
    November 22nd, 2010 at 16:47 | #9

    Rating

    Widower Barbara Covington is worried about her addicted teenage daughter Emily and decides to intervene after her lockdown efforts fail and her offspring stole money using illegal credit cards she took out in her dead father’s name. She takes her eighteen year old child to meet with a rehab center interventionist Trish Massey. However, the counselor is found dead and Emily missing. The police for obvious reasons assume Emily killed him.

    Upset and despondent, Barbara searches for her missing oldest child with her other teen Lance advising her. She vows to find Emily and the real killer before the police lock her daughter away for a homicide Barbara knows in her troubled soul her teen did not commit.

    This is a super inspirational thriller that is at its best when looking into addictive destructive behavior and at the mom-older teen daughter relationship. Barbara and Trish are fully developed characters; both at the end of their respective ropes, which each might use to hang themselves or the other. Fourteen year old Lance is too wise as if he is the interventionist guiding his mom (how old was Yoda?). The whodunit is well written, but more of a supporting device to force Barbara to personally “intervene”. Fans will appreciate this profound tale while pondering whether addiction is a personal, family or even community illness as Emily’s actions impact others.

    Harriet Klausner

  10. Sarah Jentzen
    November 24th, 2010 at 12:14 | #10

    Rating

    I really liked this book even though it had a lot of religious things thrown into the mix and usually I dont care for that kind of thing so I was really surprised that I liked this book as much as I did.

  11. world reader
    November 25th, 2010 at 05:29 | #11

    Rating

    Like many of the other reviewers I thought that the whole plot line of this books was just awful. I didn’t like any of the characters at all mainly because they alternated between being stubborn and just plain dumb.

    The only redeeming quality that I could find in this book is that parents who really are not aware of everything that teenagers put out there on the internet and how public this information is should maybe use it as a wake up call. It is horrifying to see just how naive folks can be about how much info is available simply by the click of a few keys.

    Blackstock has written some good Christian fiction, but this is not one of them.

  12. Joan
    November 25th, 2010 at 08:41 | #12

    Rating

    This has been the first book by this author That I have read and I look forward to more in the future. Although termed a religious-suspense. I did not find overly religious- just a nice blend. . . .

  13. Sterljoy
    November 29th, 2010 at 11:48 | #13

    Rating

    Love it, Love it. This is my first time reading any of Terri Blackstock books, I am now a fan. Couldnt put the book down, I was drawn into the mother pain and determination. A great book to read.

  14. TheProf
    November 30th, 2010 at 04:57 | #14

    Rating

    Terri Blackstock is a solid author with amazing talent. I know that I will not be able to put her books down once I start and this was no exception.

    Intervention follows the lives of the Covington family as they deal with eldest child, Emily’s addiction to drugs. Barbara, recently widowed, is at the end of her rope and sends for an interventionist to help scare Emily straight. When Emily agrees to go to rehab, their lives quickly pivot to an “intervention” they never saw coming. Barbara and her son, Lance, are called to Georgia when Emily goes missing after her flight with the interventionist. She is sought as a person of interest in a murder. Barbara is convinced her daughter is innocent and embarks on a rescue attempt- with or without the police’s help.

    I found the story very moving, particularly as the sibling of a drug addict. Blackstock delves very deeply into the mother’s pain and gives hints as to how the good son feels as well. At the end of the book, you discover that Blackstock is writing from a personal perspective, even though the story is fictional. I think the most powerful emotion she touched on was the anger at other Christians who offered pat advice without love, patience, and prayer.

    The mystery was good but was secondary to the overall prodigal daughter theme. I enjoyed the suspense, as always, with a good Blackstock mystery novel.

    There is a discussion guide at the end which is wonderful for book club discussion starters or Bible study.

    It is light reading and hard to put down. Highly recommended!

  15. Ashleigh M. Dean
    November 30th, 2010 at 11:34 | #15

    Rating

    I got an advanced reader copy of this book, and it was FANTASTIC! I started it one lazy afternoon at the beach, and didn’t, COULDN’T, put it down until later that night when it was finished. The characters were well-developed, the plot was very creative and the book was very unpredictable. 5 stars for sure!

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