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Advanced Management Accounting (3rd Edition)

December 31st, 2011

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Book Overview:

Contains leading-edge treatment of innovative management accounting issues used by major companies throughout the world. Advanced Management Accounting provides a systematic management- oriented approach to advanced management topics. Each chapter is accompanied by cases to illustrate the concepts discussed. Written by an authoritative author team known for establishing innovative business standards. Includes an updated chapter on Transfer Pricing to reflect more modern approaches in addition to an entire chapter on Economic Value Added (EVA). Appropriate for business professionals involved in cost accounting and/or management.


Book Review

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out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12796 user reviews
Accounting Books Contains leading-edge treatment of innovative management accounting issues used by major companies throughout the world. Advanced Management Accounting provides a systematic management- oriented approach to advanced management topics. Each chapter is accompanied by cases to illustrate the concepts discussed. Written by an authoritative author team known for establishing innovative business standards. Includes an updated chapter on Transfer Pricing to reflect more modern approaches in addition to an entire chapter on Economic Value Added (EVA). Appropriate for business professionals involved in cost accounting and/or management.
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  1. Dr.Salah Mubarek
    January 1st, 2012 at 06:52 | #1

    Rating

    This book not classic. It contains chapters deal with subjects like performance evaluation and incentives in depth and by using advanced models. It also deals with ABC & ABM by using simle examples.

  2. Anonymous
    January 1st, 2012 at 21:57 | #2

    Rating

    quisiera comprar el libro, tengo muy buena referencia del autor, y sus ideas tiene amplia aplicacion. Puedo girar dinero para comprarlo, por favor expliqueme la manera de realizar la compra sin tarjeta de credito. Por favor constestar a la brevedad

  3. Anonymous
    January 3rd, 2012 at 13:32 | #3

    Rating

    I found the text to be poorly proofread. Some of the examples in the text did not tie to the information given. I found the examples hard to follow and the explanations vague. I expected a lot more from Mr. Kaplan.

  4. Jaap Boon
    January 4th, 2012 at 15:29 | #4

    Rating

    This student textbook assumes a basic of management accounting. Well, I was known with the terms, and understood their examples, but completely lost track at the cases. At first I thought it was due to my language knowledge, but colleague students had the same problems and couldnot explain to me which information to use, which parts of the cases was useful and what was rubbish. Of course ‘management accounting’ is about retrieving the correct information, but it was a few steps to early for me.

  5. Anonymous
    January 5th, 2012 at 08:32 | #5

    Rating

    The explanation is too long, examples are vague, ambiguous and the cases provided is not really relevant to my level of knowledge. This book might be best for PhD holders, but not for me who is an undergraduate. My lecturer also complained that the explanation used is not suitable for our level. No interesting graphics or colour to attract readers.

  6. Jack
    January 6th, 2012 at 08:40 | #6

    Rating

    MBA students alike may not even have the patient to read through it. But, as a management consultant in China ( i used to work for 2 of big 4 accounting firms, and now working as a freelance to help local companies to solve their managerial costing problems), this book is my primary reference for my work. I applied ideas in this book helping my clients building ABC and transfer pricing and costing control models. When you really need to solve true business problems (rather than reading in the school), you will find this is “the” book. In my view, you have to read Kaplan and Cooper’s staff if you want to get some true knowledge about managerial accounting.

  7. Indispensable Marketing Strategies author Paul Francis Musgrave
    January 7th, 2012 at 05:57 | #7

    Rating

    The insights this book offers easily outweigh its shortcomings. Unfortunately, its shortcomings are considerable. Here are the principal ones:

    1. At 798 pages, this book is so thick that it’s hard to handle. In fact, it’s 1.75 inches thick (4.5cm). This is partly because the paper is thick, stiff, and of poor quality. Even when opened in the middle, this book will not readily lie flat on your desk. So pull out your bulldog clips and paperweights, and prepare for a struggle. The publishers should have printed this book in a larger format – such as 8.5 x 11 inches – so that fewer pages would have been necessary. And they should also have used better quality paper. Why were they so cheap? Ironically, it seems that in an effort to squeeze out every last penny of profit, the publisher’s managerial accountants prevented the proper publication of what is surely a landmark managerial accounting textbook.

    2. Within some of the chapters, examples are provided to illustrate certain points. Unfortunately, reading these examples can be tedious and confusing, because the authors tend to overwhelm the reader with a deluge of data. Unless you take the time to enter the data into a spreadsheet, you won’t get much benefit. These examples would have been far more effective if the authors had presented only the most essential data in several short tables, interspersed with comments. Bite-sized chunks of data are more easily absorbed, allowing readers to grasp the main points without being overwhelmed. Of course, complexity is to be expected among the end-of-chapter problems and case studies.

    3. The writing style is mostly fluid, succinct, and clear, though some readers may find the vocabulary too advanced, and the sentences too lengthy. But reading books of this complexity can be good mental exercise for anyone aspiring to managerial competence. Unfortunately, in some sections of the book, the writing gets bogged down with poorly constructed sentences and pointless verbosity. This is puzzling, as one would normally expect the writing to be consistently precise and succinct by the third edition of an esteemed textbook such as this. The publisher should have assigned an editor to ensure readability, eliminate grammar errors, and present all data in the most effective format.

    Recognizing the invaluable insights this book offers, and its mostly clear explanations of complex topics, I would like to give this book 5 stars. But I’m giving it just four stars because of its shortcomings. It is disappointing that the publishers failed to invest sufficient effort to realize this book’s full potential. However, despite its deficiencies, this book is very insightful and well worth reading, if you’re interested in honing your managerial accounting skills.

    Paul Francis Musgrave, author of Indispensable Marketing Strategies – How to Outwit Your Competition, Attract and Retain Customers, and Multiply Your Profits – Powerful Marketing Strategy Secrets for Profitable Small Business Management

  8. Anonymous
    January 8th, 2012 at 23:50 | #8

    Rating

    I have studied many aspects of financial and management accounting, management issues, etc. from introductory to advanced levels. I have never used such an unappealing book. The student must sift through much wordiness. There are few, and sometimes no examples of the various calculations. There is very little use of white space. Virtually no colour, no use of bullets. Not only is the material presented in a “dry” form, but the book is not pretty to look at. The most praise I can give this book is that it is not too heavy to carry, and it has a pretty blue cover.

  9. Anonymous
    January 9th, 2012 at 19:14 | #9

    Rating

    I am an accounting student at the Univ. of Sask. I had to buy this text for my Mangagement Accounting class. This book is incomplete when they are doing examples. The writers don’t explain where they got their numbers from. It’s very difficult trying to learn it. Also, the exercise problems at the end are horrible!! They are so vague!!!

  10. D. Smith
    January 10th, 2012 at 03:51 | #10

    Rating

    There is no doubt that Kaplan is one of the leaders (if not the preeminent scholar) in his field. It would be difficult, if not impossible, to do any reasonable paper or research concerning the balanced scorecard and not reference his work.

    That said, I have been in industry for more years than I care to remember, am a second year MBA accounting student at a fairly prestigious business school (no, not Harvard) with an Ivy league undergraduate education and I have received numerous academic awards.

    In reading Advanced Management Accounting (3rd Edition), I don’t know if the author was paid by the word, the page or just preferred to use 10 words when 1 will do, but I found that the value of the book was diminished by the writing style. As I alluded to earlier, the ideas presented are excellent but I am left feeling like I just sat through a 2 hour movie story that took 3 1/2 hours to tell. It certainly would be easier to carry a 400 page book to class than this 794 page version. I personally feel that it would leave a bigger mark on the student actually reading the book.

  11. Manuel Ruiz de la Presa (MBA)
    January 15th, 2012 at 01:31 | #11

    Rating

    I have studied, practiced and taught managerial accounting for more than 17 years at work, using excellent supporting text and case books from recognized US authors. But to be honest Dr. Kaplan is making easy concepts to appear complicated and cumbersome. His case readings as well as the text materials are very length and hard to “digest” since it does not capture the attention of the reader.I would not recommend the book neither for and undergraduate or graduate degree, despite the well known and worldwide recognition of Dr. Kaplan. His book is far from being pedagogical in nature.

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