Home > History Books > 48 Liberal Lies About American History: (That You Probably Learned in School)

48 Liberal Lies About American History: (That You Probably Learned in School)

November 1st, 2010

Rating:
List Price: Add to cart to see price
Sale Price: Too low to display.

Book Overview:

A historian debunks four-dozen PC myths about our nation’s past. Over the last forty years, history textbooks have become more and more politically correct and distorted about our country’s past, argues professor Larry Schweikart. The result, he says, is that students graduate from high school and even college with twisted beliefs about economics, foreign policy, war, religion, race relations, and many other subjects. As he did in his popular A Patriot’s History of the United States, Professor Schweikart corrects liberal bias by rediscovering facts that were once widely known. He challenges distorted books by name and debunks forty-eight common myths. A sample: • The founders wanted to create a “wall of separation” between church and state • Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation only because he needed black soldiers • Truman ordered the bombing of Hiroshima to intimidate the Soviets with “atomic diplomacy” • Mikhail Gorbachev, not Ronald Reagan, was responsible for ending the Cold War America’s past, though not perfect, is far more admirable than you were probably taught.


Book Review

Read the book reviews below. If you have read , You can add your own review below.

out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12796 user reviews
History Books A historian debunks four-dozen PC myths about our nation’s past. Over the last forty years, history textbooks have become more and more politically correct and distorted about our country’s past, argues professor Larry Schweikart. The result, he says, is that students graduate from high school and even college with twisted beliefs about economics, foreign policy, war, religion, race relations, and many other subjects. As he did in his popular A Patriot’s History of the United States, Professor Schweikart corrects liberal bias by rediscovering facts that were once widely known. He challenges distorted books by name and debunks forty-eight common myths. A sample: • The founders wanted to create a “wall of separation” between church and state • Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation only because he needed black soldiers • Truman ordered the bombing of Hiroshima to intimidate the Soviets with “atomic diplomacy” • Mikhail Gorbachev, not Ronald Reagan, was responsible for ending the Cold War America’s past, though not perfect, is far more admirable than you were probably taught.
http://www.bookpool.org/5653-48-liberal-lies-about-american-history-that-you-probably-learned-in-school/

Similar Books:

  1. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong
  2. Don’t Know Much About History: Everything You Need to Know About American History but Never Learned (Don’t Know Much…
  3. Electrical Engineering 101, Second Edition: Everything You Should Have Learned in School…but Probably Didn’t
  4. History’s Greatest Lies: The Startling Truths Behind World Events our History Books Got Wrong
  5. A History of the American People
Categories: History Books Tags:
  1. W. S. Jones
    November 1st, 2010 at 17:36 | #1

    Rating

    Great book! It’s refreshing to read a history that isn’t always bashing a)the U.S. Government or b) the American people (and capitalism in general). I’ve heard most of the these lies over the last several years and in many books (a few of which the author mentions) and seeing them handily refuted in print is very nice. It is a go-to reference book for information on many issues.

    Some of the better lies exposed include:

    - FDR knew about Pearl Harbor

    - Truman used the a-bombs on Japan to intimidate the soviets.

    - Nixon expanded the Vietnam War.

    - Sept. 11th was a government conspiracy.

    - Columbus killed millions of Indians.

    - Mainstream news is fair and balanced.

    - High School history books are not biased

    Highly Recommended.

  2. A Fan
    November 2nd, 2010 at 19:00 | #2

    Rating

    This book is an excellent resource that corrects many errors in popular American History textbooks and misconceptions about American history. Every history teacher and school administrator should read this book BEFORE ordering his or her history textbooks. It would also be good reading for everybody else to correct misinformation they may have been taught in school. If you care about facts and real history, you should read this book. Highly recommended!

  3. Dan Schobert
    November 3rd, 2010 at 17:54 | #3

    Rating

    Professor Schweikart has presented a worthwhile book in an effort to set the record straight. This work is something every student of history should read. It has been said that we learn nothing from history but this is true only to the extent history is ignored. Even if a person disagrees with Schweikart’s work, a reader will come away knowing that not everything is as clear as some may assume. He clears away a lot of the fog which has so often given a fuzzy picture of what truly has happened. Going all the way back to George Washington, Schweikart has pinpointed important times in American history and shown how we’ve gotten the wrong picture.

    Highly recommended.

  4. Craig Matteson
    November 6th, 2010 at 04:39 | #4

    Rating

    While I think the title of the book is needlessly provocative, I think this a very useful book for anyone who has been subjected to the kind of indoctrination that passes for history education in too many of our public schools and colleges. If you are looking for some quick information on these four dozen issues, this can help you pass on some solid information that probably runs counter to what your friends believe is so. I said the title is needlessly provocative because not all liberals buy into the points of view this book argues against. However, Larry Schweikart is correct that there is a general cultural agenda that supports the liberal view of things. He starts off each article with two or three short quotes from liberal histories that are countered in that article.

    The articles cover notions of America’s role in the world since the founding, the issues in the various wars we have fought, what FDR knew about Pearl Harbor, Truman and the Atomic Bomb, the JFK assassination, Reagan, key liberal causes such as Sacco and Vanzetti, the Rosenbergs, the Scopes Trial, Columbus and the death of millions of Indians, that pesky wall between Church and State, Women’s Rights in early American, the Settling of America and the Indians, and the Robber Barons. Modern issues such as Iraq, 9/11, Global Warming, Media Bias, Educational Bias, and the social theories about our Constitution are also covered. Schweikart admits that saying that the 9/11 conspiracy nuts are liberal is a stretch, but he says he wanted to head off the kind of shoulder shrugs modern texts give to the JFK assassination conspiracy nonsense.

    The articles are all relatively short and pack a punch. I am absolutely positive that it will annoy liberals a great deal and some of them will attack the book without bothering to read it. I guess that is a side benefit of the book. Its real point is to push back against what some are trying to make dominant and accepted without critique. Of course, wanting to indoctrinate students is a matter of faith rather than scholarship or education.

    If you home school you will definitely want that as an addition to your readings in American History.

    You will also want to look at Schweikart’s `A Patriot’s History of the United States”.

    A Patriot’s History of the United States: From Columbus’s Great Discovery to the War on Terror

    Reviewed by Craig Matteson, Ann Arbor, MI

  5. Richard H. Fawcett
    November 7th, 2010 at 12:33 | #5

    Rating

    For the most part an accurate review of how history has been slanted in recent years. The section on Richard Nixon and on Bill Clinton was spot on. The American Indian chapter was a bit shakey and lacking in concrete facts, probably because it depended on debateable historical information. Overall, however, it reinforced a statement of one of my old college professors (c. 1953) that history must be written at least 50 years after the fact, anything else is just newscasting; and we all know how inaccurate that can be.

  6. andris virsnieks
    November 8th, 2010 at 17:27 | #6

    Rating

    We are heading into an election and we have a massive credit crises that could throw us into a deep recession. If you don’t have time to read all 48 lies, because you are watching the stock market. And the money market too! I recommend you start with lie #44 “Business Failures and Tax Cuts Combined to cause the Great Depression”. You will gain perspective and you will be better able to see how the ground-work for new lies that will surly come out of this current great economic crises is already being laid today.

  7. Burton W. Folsom Jr.
    November 9th, 2010 at 07:52 | #7

    Rating

    Professor Schweikart has written a valuable and timely book. He takes on rampant political correctness in the writing of history texts and comes through with a five star performance. He is an expert on U. S. economic history but his breadth is apparent when he takes on standard leftist biases in diplomatic history as well as political history. One interesting thing Schweikart notices is that often a liberal slant will emerge on a topic and become entrenched in the texts. Then other historians will test the liberal idea and find many facts to contradict it. However, the history texts do not make the corrections and the bias is passed on to future generations. Schweikart shows this to be the case in the view of the motives in writing the Constitution and also in the Sacco and Vanzetti case (among others). Schweikart is an expert on economic history, but is very capable when exposing biases on Ronald Reagan, JFK, and LBJ. His emphasis is on modern U. S. history, but he is also excellent describing the first Thanksgiving, Thomas Jefferson, and the Mexican and Spanish American Wars.

  8. David M. Dougherty
    November 9th, 2010 at 08:55 | #8

    Rating

    Author Larry Schweikart has done the American public a valuable service in exposing the liberal biases in American textbooks that have helped move the public markedly to the left in the last five decades. He has done this in a very readable fashion — actually this book is almost fun to read if the subject wasn’t so disturbing.

    Schweikart is admittedly a conservative academic historian; a very rare bird indeed and something simply not permitted on faculties of “elite” universities like those in the Ivy League who are promoting the Bilderberg agenda and producing globalist and socialist leaders. One wonders even how he gets along at the University of Dayton with its overwhelming numbers of leftist faculty.

    Some of the “Lies” Schweikart presents are extremely well researched and argued while others would take many more pages to firmly nail down the truth. He comes up short, for example, on the leftist contention than North America was populated by vast numbers of Indians (some “historians” go as high as 90 million) before Columbus arrived. He fails to mention the leftist methodology for arriving at the “high” estimates. Those promoting such absurd figures take the Indian populations as estimated by colonists and explorers (already high estimates), then after assuming those populations to be only 5% of their former numbers due to European-introduced diseases and European brutality, they fecklessly multiple those numbers by 20.

    Another “Liberal Lie” that troubled me was #3, “FDR Knew in Advance About the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor.” First of all, this contention normally comes from the conservative side rather than the liberal. In addition, the preponderance of evidence shows that Roosevelt did believe an attack at Pearl Harbor was quite possible, but he also believed all necessary precautions had been taken by his military commanders to repel such an attack. Kimmel was an aggressive commander, and Short supposedly had put the Army at the highest possible alert level. Unfortunately, Short had reversed the alert level numbers without informing Marshall, so Marshall thought Short was at the highest alert level when actually he was at the lowest. The rest, as they say, is history.

    The last “Lie” I wish to comment on is Schweikart’s correction that Slavery was indeed the driving force behind the Civil War. As Schweikart points out, Slavery was THE issue causing the South’s secession. However, the motivation for most of the South’s men to fight was not to preserve slavery, but rather to defend self-determination and their home-grown rights. (See McPherson, “Why They Fought.”) This is an important distinction, and one not often made in the North.

    Yes, history textbooks are biased to the left, and this work exposes that fact for parents who care how their children are indoctrinated in school. They should purchase and read this book. Even if some “Lies” can be subject to discussion, it is exactly this discussion that makes this book so valuable. Parents could do much worse than go over every one of the 48 “Lies” with their children to help balance their education. Education is simply too important to be left up to teachers and educators.

    Highly recommended.

  9. GenJBGordon
    November 9th, 2010 at 11:42 | #9

    Rating

    Excellent read/ I skipped some chapters to jump ahead to areas of history-that interest me: Lie #24 “Abraham Lincoln Only Freed the Slaves to Beef Up His Troop Strength”. Many of these agendas and misconceptions that are held by many people shooting their mouths off:”Bill Clinton was impeached over sex{Lie # 29),etc. I recommend this to anyone,not just Republicans or Republican history buffs-which might put some people off. Historians or Liberal Historians that compare President Obama to Lincoln should read this.

  10. CeeCee
    November 9th, 2010 at 20:22 | #10

    Rating

    We still have an edition World Book Encyclopedia published in 1984 and one published in 1965. It is interesting to verify his complaints about modern text books. The re-writing of history is most disburbing. Find an old encyclopedia and check it out for yourself unless you are old enough to actually remember some of the events of the 1940′s till today like I am. Many of us are still around who remember when the nasty lies about the USA were told by our enemies; not by our text books, movies, etc. After verifying facts for yourself, please take action to break this pattern of self-destruction. Please confront your local school boards when you find lies in text books. Hit the text book publishers in the “pocket book.” One test is that if a text gets Reagan right, it might be OK. Surely you are old enough to remember those actual events!

  11. Frank Savelli
    November 10th, 2010 at 18:22 | #11

    Rating

    It is really sad that a book such as this needs to be written. One of the striking fallacies of Keynesian economics is the benefits of deficit spending. Milton Friedman (who is quoted in this book) and Ludwig von Mises completely destroyed Keynesianism years ago. But unfortunately there are many other flat out lies or exaggerations that are taught as fact in our schools and colleges today through either blatant political, economic or social bias/envy that are even today being implemented by government policy. One major lie that is covered is that tax cuts decrease tax revenues! Anyone who has read anything on economics outside of the buffoon Keynes knows that tax cuts spur economic growth and produces more income for the government, while tax increases decrease job creation and tax income. This was proven during the second Reagan term and into Bush’s term until Bush and Congress raised taxes. Political beliefs have nothing to do with it, it is pure economics.

    There are many other points covered in here (obviously 47 more) that are covered by the author. He’ll even make you laugh out loud with his comments about the lunacy of some of the ‘thinking’ of liberal history and textbook authors.

  12. History teacher
    November 12th, 2010 at 15:53 | #12

    Rating

    As a lifetime history teacher I heartily endorse this book. It is the perfect counterpoint to such best selling drivel as Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James W. Loewen. I have spent my teaching career battling revisionism in American History. I think that it a destructive force which teaches our children to hate their own country. I believe what Churchill said about revealing history “warts and all”, but I have seen a self-destructive spiral in US History instruction where ALL wars are wrong, ALL presidents have underhanded, ulterior motives for their actions, and America can do nothing but wrong. I never excluded or tried to cover up our mistakes and faults, but I didn’t dwell on the negative aspects of our history so much that I turned my students into unpatriotic cynics. I always taught my students to respect all viewpoints and feel that teachers who try to indoctrinate students to their political views are unprofessional and abuse their authority. I despise the political correctness movement and what it has done to history education. We are so obsessed with using the right labels and not offending anyone, that we have watered down history books to the point of making them uninteresting. This book does a great job of debunking the prevailing myths that are taught in many history classrooms today. I only wish that it went into more detail and provided more scholarly documentation for those of us who are so inclined.

  13. Right-Wing Nutjob
    November 12th, 2010 at 22:29 | #13

    Rating

    I’m a history major who just recently graduated college, and about half of the myths in the book took me by surprise. While I’ve never believed in the 9/11 or JFK conspiracies, others had indeed been parroted to me by my professors in college, in particular, that the Civil War was not at all about slavery, or that Truman nuked Japan to intimidate the Soviets; and I bought it, hook, line, and sinker. The author’s research on these subjects shows that “states rights” and “preserving the union” were just smoke-and-mirrors to mask the debate over slavery; and the real casualty estimates regarding an invasion of Japan just blew me away. Many other myths are debunked in this book, making it a must read for everybody. It was a wake up call for this history graduate that subtle bias does indeed exist in textbooks, and should be regarded as a caution to current students and their parents, who are most likely paying for their education.

  14. Eric Mayforth
    November 13th, 2010 at 04:12 | #14

    Rating

    The author of this book, “48 Liberal Lies About American History”, notes that high school and college students today are frequently forced to use textbooks that view America not as a great country with some flaws, but as fundamentally evil, racist, and oppressive.

    Larry Schweikart, a history professor at the University of Dayton, takes four dozen of the most common myths promulgated by the Left about American history and, after having conducted extensive research, refutes them in this heavily footnoted volume. The author battles falsehoods of every era of our history, from the seventeenth century to our own. Schweikart does not shy away from even the most controversial topics of recent decades, such as the JFK assassination, the Vietnam War, the 2000 presidential election, and climate change.

    Schweikart tackles many of the myths that immediately spring to mind when liberal revisionism of American history is discussed, but also looks at some less-considered topics, such as industrial policy and its effect on the auto and steel industries.

    This book will be heartily enjoyed by students and history buffs who view America not as evil, but as the most important force for good in the world today.

  15. C. I. Flatz
    November 13th, 2010 at 10:31 | #15

    Rating

    I bought this book for my granddaughter. She was reading it during reading time in her classroom. Her eighth grade teacher noticed the title and asked if he could take a look. He started reading and couldn’t put it down, she wondered if he was going to give it back. Finally he smiled as he handed back the book and commented very good. Perhaps this teacher is the exception but my granddaughters story certainly made my day.

Comments are closed.